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Alocasia macrorrhiza ‘Lutea’

Categories:
07/01/2019

Common Name:
Yellow Stem Alocasia

Type of Plant:
Tropical

Description:
aroid

Country Of Origin:
Papua, New Guinea

Alocasia macrorrhizos (also ‘macrorrhiza’) ‘Lutea’ or ‘Solid Gold’ is a giant Alocasia, easily growing to 2 metres high in good tropical conditions. In cooler areas you should expect at least 1 to 1.5 metres. It has glossy emerald green leaves up to 1 metre long held stiffly upwards, with prominent veining on the underside of the leaves.

However, the striking and spectacular aspect of this plant is, of course, the buttercup yellow stems and veins on the undersides of the leaves. It is a bright and obvious yellow, not just a pale green or lemon colour, and these photos haven’t had the colour adjusted. The more light the plants receive, the brighter the stem and the darker the leaf will be. The stems of young plants are a lighter, greenish colour until they get a few leaves; as they get older, the yellow colour becomes more prominent.

This is a fast growing Alocasia and in good conditions, will grow from the size of the plant you receive (15-20cm high) to 1.5 to 2 metres in less than a year. It grows larger in the ground than in pots – Alocasias seem to need a lot of room for their roots to get the huge leaves.

Alocasias require continual warmth and humidity. The soil should be rich but well drained, and the plant appreciates frequent watering (daily in hot weather), especially as if grows larger. Note however, that when the plant is young and small, too much water (particularly if the weather is cold) will rot the tuber, so be careful not to overdo it.

Bright light is preferred, but it will do well in anything up to 80% shade. Leaves tend to grow larger in shadier positions. Full sun is usually not preferred and may discolour the leaves, although it will usually cope with a bit of full sun provided it can get enough water.

Once it gets big enough, it will start to produce offsets (baby plants) which can be easily transplanted.

Alpinia zerumbet ‘Variegata’

Categories:
07/01/2019

Alpinia zerumbet ‘Variegata’
Family: Zingiberaceae
Variegated ginger
Origin: South Africa

This species is valued for it’s variegated foliage, and beautiful flowers. Gingers prefer the shaded and moist environment of valleys. If you have a shaded corner in your garden or a group of trees that make shade this will be ideal places. In-door locations where no direct sun light can burn the leaves are good places. Gingers make seeds that germinate well in warm and moist soil.

Alstonia scholaris

Categories:
07/01/2019

Family: Apocynaceae
Blackboard Tree, Indian Devil Tree, Ditabark, Milkwood Pine, White Cheesewood, Saptaparni
Origin: Southeastern Asia

 

The tree has white, strongly perfumed flowers and is cultivated as an ornamental plant. The bark used to serve as an alternative to quinine.

We have this plant for sale

Alstonia scholaris is a very useful herb as blood purifier, anti bacterial, skin diseases and respiratory distress. rejuvenates digestive system so it is used in chronic dysentery, diarrhea. Alstonia also works well in skin disorders, malarial fever, urticaria. Besides all this Alstonia is also useful as a cytotoxic herb so it is also used in cancerous growth in the body.

Effect on Doshas: ·

  • Saptaparna is tridoshaghna, especially kaphavatashamak.

Saptaparna is used for the treatment of disease which arise due to tridosha and kaphavata

Alternanthera dentata Ruby

Categories:
07/01/2019

Family: Amaranthaceae
Joseph’s Coat, Calico plant, Copperleaf, Bloodleaf, Joyweed, Parrot leaf , Globe amaranthus
Origin: West Indies to Brazil

Grown exclusively for its colorful foliage – rich purple to burgundy leaves. Forms spreading foliage mounds to 12-30″ tall. Common names – Joseph’s coat, copperleaf, calico plant, bloodleaf, joyweed and parrot leaf – all in reference to the often brilliantly colored leaves which provide foliage contrast to gardens and container plantings.Best foliage colors are developed in full sun. It grows better in organically rich and consistently moist, well-drained soils, But not completely dry out. May also be grown indoors as a houseplant as long as it is sited in a bright, sunny location and soils are kept moist. Plants may be grown from seed by starting them indoors in late winter and transplanting them outdoors after last frost date. Pinching stems or shearing will keep plants compact and bushy.

Alternanthera sp.

Categories:
07/01/2019

Family: Amaranthaceae
Bloodleaf

Amaranth redroot, ‘scarlet temple’. This groundhugging and evergreen groundcover is usually grown for its brilliant foliage. Two color variations are available – one form has brownish red and green leaves with shadings of pink; the other has green and yellow leaves. The flowers of this plant are very insignificant, bearing small bracts on a single stalk. These are best cut off, to allow the plant to concentrate on it’s foliage. An attractive border plant or groundcover. About 10cm high, 1m spread.

Although Alternanthera can usually only be found during the warmer months in nurseries, it can be grown all year round. Grows best in full sun and in good soil this plant will respond handsomely. Fertilizing should be done with a water soluble variety so as not to burn the foliage. Can be clipped occassionally to form a neat low edging.

Propagation can be done by dividing larger plants during the cooler months of the year. Suitable for all climates with tempereture 17 – 28C (62 – 8 F), growing rate: slow.

Species and varieties:

Alternanthera dentata Ruby

Alternanthera ficoidea

Alternanthera Snow Ball

Amaranthus tricolor

Categories:
07/01/2019

Family: Amaranthaceae
Joseph’s coat, Fountain plant
Origin: Tropical Africa and Asia

Tolerates heat, drought and poor soil; subject to root rot if kept too moist; over fertilization may cause dulling of foliage color.

Amaryllis belladonna, Callicore rosea

Categories:
07/01/2019

Family: Amaryllidaceae / Liliaceae
Belladonna Lily, March Lily, Naked Lady
Origin: South Africa

The large clusters of scented, trumpet-shaped pink or white flowers are carried on a long purplish-red and green stem appearing 50cm above the soil. Up to twelve flowers are produced from the flowering stem. These flowers are 10cm long and apically flare open about 8cm. The inflorescence tends to face the direction that receives the most sun.

The strap-like leaves are deciduous and are produced after flowering.

Amherstia nobilis

Categories:
07/01/2019

Family: Caesalpinioideae / Caesalpiniaceae
Pride of Burma, Orchid Tree
Origin: Myanmar (Burma)

Perhaps the most beautiful of flowering tropical trees, certainly attractive enough to earn the sobriquet Queen of Flowering Trees. Obscure origins add to the mystique of this noble petite tree. It has only been collected from the wild a couple of times, in the forests of Burma, leading to its common name Pride of Burma. The tree has compound leaves and a great profusion of large, irregular, yellow-spotted scarlet flowers. The genus is named after Lady Sarah Amherst, who collected plants in Asia in the early Nineteenth century. Not only is she commemorated in one of the most beautiful of the worlds trees, she also lends her name to Lady Amherst pheasant one of the most elegant birds. The new leaves are produced in flaccid pale tassels that turn purplish before they green and open out. When not in flower, Amherstia looks similar to Saracca, another Asian legume genus. The leaves unfurl in handkerchief fashion like the Brownea and Maniltoa. New leaf growth is reddish, hangs down at first.

Bambusa vulgaris

Categories:
05/01/2019

Common name: Golden bamboo

Bambusa vulgaris forms moderately loose clumps and has no thorns.[7] It has lemon-yellow culms (stems) with green stripes and dark green leaves.[8]Stems are not straight, not easy to split, inflexible, thick-walled, and initially strong.[9] The densely tufted culms grow 10–20 metres (30–70 ft) high and 4–10 centimetres (2–4 in) thick.[4][10] Culms are basally straight or flexuose (bent alternately in different directions), drooping at the tips. Culm walls are slightly thick.[11] Nodes are slightly inflated. Internodes are 20–45 centimetres (7.9–18 in). Several branches develop from mid-culm nodes and above. Culm leaves are deciduous with dense pubescence.[7] Leaf blades are narrowly lanceolate.[11]

Flowering is not common, and there are no seeds. Fruits are rare due to low pollen viability caused by irregular meiosis.[6] At the interval of several decades the whole population of an area bloom at once,[12] and individual stems bear a large number of flowers.[6] Vegetation propagates through clump division, by rhizome, stem and branch cutting, layering and marcotting.[10][13] The easiest and most practised cultivation method is culm or branch cutting. In the Philippines, the best results were obtained from one-node cuttings from the lower parts of six-month-old culms.[6] When a stem dies, the clump usually survives.[6] A clump can grow out of stem used for poles, fences, props, stakes or posts.[13] Its rhizomes extend up to 80 cm before turning upward to create open fast-spreading clumps.[14] The easy propagation of B. vulgaris explains its seemingly wild occurrence.

Barringtonia acutangula

Categories:
05/01/2019

Family: Lecythidaceae
Freshwater Mangrove, Indian Oak, Indian Putat
Origin: Southeast Asia