Flower Plants

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Acacia auriculiformis

Categories:
07/01/2019

Acacia auriculiformis
Family: Mimosoideae / Mimosaceae
Darwin Black Wattle, Ear Pod Wattle

Very fast growing, undemanding ornamental and shade tree. Honey-sweet, showy yellow flowers attract bees and butterflies. The plant is amazing in its ability to recolonize waste. Hard to kill. Can grow as much as 6-8 ft per season. Mature trees are medium sized. If you are looking for a fast result, this shade tree is for you. The plant is amazing in its ability to recolonize waste, paper mill sludge; even uranium spoils. This is the only tree found on a 20-year old uranium spoil. Cold hardy to some freeze.

Acalypha hispaniolae

Categories:
07/01/2019

Family: Euphorbiaceae
Hispaniola cat’s tail ,Cat Tails, Kitten’s Tail, Trailing Acalypha

Acalypha can be evergreen shrubs or trees, or annuals, with simple leaves and catkin-like racemes of tiny flowers, brightly coloured in some species

A. hispaniolae is a compact, somewhat trailing shrub with neat, ovate dark green leaves, and crimson flower spikes 5 – 7cm in length, from spring to autumn

acalypha hispida

Categories:
07/01/2019

This plant needs a humid environment, and frequent watering during the summer growing season. A. hispida has plain, green leaves, but compensates by producing masses of long, bright red inflorescences that hang down and give rise to its popular name of “Cat’s Tails”. The brightly colored pendulous tassels are extremely showy. Acalypha species require full sun, well-drained soil, and careful pruning to prevent them from becoming leggy.

Acalypha Inferno

Categories:
07/01/2019

Flame Copper leaf

Acalypha ‘Inferno’ will grow to about a metre, are easy to manage and also have interesting foliage.

Acalypha wilkesiana

Categories:
07/01/2019

A.New red, A.Holland , Fire Dragon Acalypha, Hoja de Cobre, Copper Leaf

This spreading shrub from tropical and subtropical regions can reach 6 feet tall. It is grown as a houseplant or as an annual outdoors where it’s not hardy. Its oval leaves are splashed with red, green, and yellow and its long, fuzzy flowers are borne periodically throughout the year, although they are somewhat hidden. Acalypha wilkesiana ‘Tricolor’ can be grown in a warm greenhouse, in a border, or as a specimen or hedging plant (especially in warm areas).

Acoelorraphe wrightii

Categories:
07/01/2019

Acoelorraphe wrightii, Acoelorrhaphe

Paurotis, Silver Saw Palmetto, Everglades Palm

Commonly seen at the edges of islands, not in long-standing water. It likes full sun or some light shade, is tolerant to a variety of soil conditions but is not happy about being planted in high pH soils. The palm grows in clusters of trunks and is rated at about 20 feet high. Small, neat, fan-shaped leaves atop chestnut brown stems gives it an attractive appearance..

Adenium hybrid, Adenium multiflorum

Categories:
07/01/2019

Family: Apocynaceae
Desert Rose, Impala Lily, Adenium hybrids

Exotic species of Adenium: Adenium swazicum, Adenium somalense, Adenium arabicum, Adenium boehmianum, Adenium multiflorum, Adenium crispum, Adenium obesum. Adeniums have many spectacular hybrids. The basic culture is very similar to orchids. A small pot with excellent drainage is a must. Adeniums do not like both over-watering or drying-out. There is a little secret of how to create a weird shape of the base: lift the plant a bit every time you re-pot the plant, so that the upper part of roots will be a little exposed. The plant will form more roots that will go down. To make your plant develop a large swollen base/trunk, you’ll need a good quality fertilizer. Fetilizer requirement for swelling up trunks is also used to increase flowering. It shouldnt be too hight in nitrogen, the middle number should be the highest. Never apply fertilizer directly on roots and do not liquid feed when a plant is thirsty: always water first slightly to avoid root burn and leaf drop. Do not wet leaves. Adeniums need lots of light for heavy flowering. Most hybrids and species start blooming in the spring when the conditions are warm and days get longer, and continue blooming through the fall and winter in warmer climates. Adeniums like a neutral to hard water. Acidic water tends to sour the soil too fast and may cause root rot. Water plants preferably in the early morning, and allow them to drink up throughout the day. Watering can be done daily to every few days. Never allow your plants to sit in a saucer of water, but don’t let them to dry out too often – this causes adeniums to go into early dormancy.

Adenocalymma alliaceum;

Categories:
07/01/2019

Common name: Garlic Vine

Adenocalymma alliaceum ( A. alliaceum) is well known for its traditional medicinal uses and as a substitute for garlic. The methanol extract from A. alliaceum flowers (AAF) was investigated for its growth inhibitory activity on the estrogen receptor positive MCF-7 and estrogen receptor negative MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells by MTT assay.

Agapanthus sp

Categories:
07/01/2019

Family: Alliaceae / Liliaceae /Amaryllidaceae
African Lily
Origin: South Africa

The Agapanthus is a genus of between six and ten species of herbaceous, perennial plants. Members of this genus have funnel-shaped flowers, which show diverse bluish colors. They occur in many-flowered cymes on long, erect stems, which can grow up 1 m long. The basal leaves are curved, lanceolate, and are up to 60 cm long.

Allamanda blanchetii, Allamanda violacea Cherry Jubilee

Categories:
07/01/2019

Family: Apocynaceae
Cherry allamanda, Purple Allamanda
Origin: Brazil

This evergreen tropical vine blooms during summer and fall: glossy point burgundy-brown buds open into flowers with 5 partially overlapped petals of an unusual tint of pink – cherry ice cream. Their narrow, funnel-shaped basements are a bit darker. In cool weather the petals change it’s color for more saturate. The flowers are followed by thorny ovoid seed-capsules. Long, bright green, fuzzy leaves with slightly wavy edges are gathered in whisks on weak creeping stalks. During a season allamanda grows up for 2″ to 9″, highest possible height is 9-18ft. Using regular prune you can have a shrub or a twister. The plant has neither thorns nor tendrils it demands support to keep it’s shape. It twists around in a certain specific direction. Do not try to change the direction – it may cause damage to the vine! As flowers are usually generated on young sprouts, late or too short prune may result in poor blossoming. The best time for pruning is November. Allamanda grows well in full sun or in light shade and prefers soil with good drainage. It does not tolerate either drought or flooding. From November till February the plant should have a time for repose – the optimal temperature is about 65F and watering must be less then usual (but the soil still should be always gently moist). In case of temperature drop below 59f for a long time the vine weakens and may die. Allamanda suffers from draughts to a more or lesser extent. Allamanda can be propagated by cuttings, air-layers, and seeds. Seeds come up in 3 – 6 weeks. They should be kept in a light, warm place, in moist but not wet soil. It grows well when was grafted on yellow allamanda. If grown indoors should be watered regularly with warm water. All the parts of the plant are toxic if it is swallowed. Latex is irritating for skin. Allamanda is subject to white-flies, spider-tick and nematodes. Can be cultivated as annual.